For years, we’ve been taught that fats are bad. Parents, health advisors, trainers, celebrities on the TV urged us to remove the fats from our diet or – if we must eat them – at least, switch to low-fat foods. However, if you were one of those people, who actually followed this advice, you’ve probably noticed it hasn’t done much good for your body or health. But why?

Because fats are actually good for you. I know, it’s counter-intuitive, but it’s true: fats are a major source of energy for your body. Fats are also vital for the absorption of minerals and vitamins – vitamin K, A, D, and E are actually fat-soluble vitamins, which means that they cannot be used, unless there is fat in your intestines.

Moreover, fats are needed as they build the cell membranes of your cells, as well as the sheath membrane that covers your nerve fibers. If there isn’t enough fat to insulate the nerves, the nerve transmission would slow down.

However, there is some truth to the fact that some fats are bad for you. Trans-fats and saturated fats are generally harmful to your health in the long-term, but this isn’t true for the unsaturated fats. The trans fats are produced as a byproduct of the hydrogenation process, while the “good” fats come from vegetables, nuts and fish (especially salmon). Omega-3 fatty acids, for instance, are contained in mackerel, salmon, and sardines, and are essential for your cardiovascular health. They might prevent heart disease and stroke, and reduce your blood pressure, so make sure to include them in your diet. Omega-6 fatty acids come from safflower, soybean and sunflower oil, and are also linked to cardiovascular health.

Forget the rule “fats are bad” and embrace the “good” ones as part of your healthy lifestyle!

 

Reference:

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-truth-about-fats-bad-and-good

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